4 Steps to Honoring an Elderly Parent's Wishes

On Monday, we discussed honoring end-of-life wishes from the elderly parents perspective.

Although having this discussion is difficult, honoring the wishes of an aging loved one is an extremely important aspect of end-of-life care. It makes the journey much more comfortable for them, and also puts you at ease.

So to continue our talk about honored wishes, today, we’re going to talk about a few ways that you can get on the right track towards honoring an elderly parent’s wishes.

Here are a few things you should keep in mind at this important time:

1. Try to have the discussion sooner rather than later

In our previous post, we mentioned that time is priceless. As such, we believe that you should have the discussion about end-of-life wishes with your loved ones as soon as possible.

While this may be a difficult conversation to have, especially when your loved one is in perfectly good health, it’s important to make sure that you try to understand your loved ones wishes before it becomes urgent. This allows you to have adequate time to prepare them for as comfortable a journey as possible.

2. Find an appropriate time and place to ask

Finding an appropriate time and place to have the discussion is another important step in the process and will make things much easier. In some instances, a private one-on-one discussion may be best–reducing the likelihood of having your loved one feel overwhelmed or ambushed by a group.

3. Ask permission

Not all parents are ready to have this kind of discussion. Along with finding an appropriate setting, make sure to ask their permission before you engage them.

Forcing the conversation will only make things more stressful, and might even make your parents less willing to have any sort of discussion in the future.

4. Take the time to prepare yourself for the discussion

Before you have a conversation about end-of-life wishes with your loved one, make sure that you feel confident and ready. The conversation may be difficult, and quite frankly, frightening for your parent to have.

Above all, be patient, open, and comforting. Showing your parent that you are willing to hear them out and guide them in their time of need will make the process much easier for you, and most importantly for them.

We understand how difficult of a conversation this can be. But by keeping your loved ones perspective in mind, you’ll make their journey that much better. If you need help having those conversations, we are here for you. Feel free to contact us at any time with your questions, comments, or concerns.

Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of geriatric care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. Get your free Cost Comparison guide by clicking here. Or contact us for a free consultation or just to say hello!

photo credit: eljoja via photopin cc

“Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.private-duty.pchhc.com.”

Honored Wishes-- A Parent's Perspective

 

In our series on end-of-life Care, we mentioned the importance of assessing your loved ones end-of-life wishes.

Honoring the wishes of a loved one is an extremely important aspect of end-of-life care. Not only does it make the journey much more comfortable for them, it also puts you and your family at ease, knowing that you are fulfilling your loved ones wishes.

In this series, we will discuss the various aspects of honored wishes, from the perspective of the elderly parent, to the perspective of the family members or gatekeeper.

For today, we’ll start with the perspective of the elderly parent.

Below, we’ve outlined a few things that you and your loved one should take into consideration when thinking about end-of-life wishes. These are all things you can discuss with an aging loved one, and things that you should think about when having end-of-life conversations with an aging parent.

Time is priceless

In many situations throughout our lives, we find ourselves thinking that we will have the time to do everything that we want–often wasting time on things that may not matter or greatly impact our lives.

Despite our belief that we have all the time in the world, the time we have is limited. And, when faced with a life-changing event, time becomes even more valuable. We believe that time is something that should be honored and cherished, because you can’t trade it for something better or buy more of it.

Self-reflection is important

As time becomes more precious, it’s important to reflect on the things most dear to you. Outline your priorities, consider all of your options, and think about how you see yourself spending the rest of your life. Whether you have just a few months or many years, think about the things you truly want in life.

Your wishes don’t need to be grand

Don’t be afraid to ask for the little things. Even the smallest and simplest wish can make a world of difference in the end.

Despite what you may think, your wishes–no matter how small they may be–are just as important and unique as the big ones. Looking for the grandiose can put an undue amount of stress on you, and that’s the last thing you want or need.

Let your wishes be known

The most critical thing we can tell you is to let your wishes be known. Make sure they are heard loud and clear. You’ll feel at ease knowing that your wishes will be fulfilled, and you’ll also help make the process much easier for your family.

As the child of an aging parent, you should always think from your loved one’s perspective when having these kinds of conversations. Thinking things through completely helps make the end-of-life process much easier for everyone, and thinking about your loved one’s perspectives is a great way to show them how much you care.

Knowing where to start with having your wishes honored can be difficult. If you need help starting the conversation, communicating with your friends and family, or having a plan put in place, give us a call. At Encompass, we strive to provide the best for all stages of the aging process. Most of all, we would be honored to make your wishes come true.

Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of geriatric care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. Get your free Cost Comparison guide by clicking here. Or contact us for a free consultation or just to say hello!

photo credit: Javier Medina M. via photopin cc

“Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.private-duty.pchhc.com.”

Greetings!

Thanksgiving is just around the corner. We’ve made the shopping lists and have the pantry filled with everyone’s favorite treats. Enjoy the Holiday!
In this issue:

Featured Post

FallsHere at Encompass, we give our readers a lot of information about falls. Whether we’re talking about injuries that happen after falls or how to prevent falls, we want to make sure that you’re as informed as possible. But unfortunately, sometimes, falls do happen, and it’s essential that you know what to do real-time in case you happen to see someone fall. Here, we give some advice on what to do if you fall or see someone fall. Continue reading

Popular Blog Posts

PostureOne way to help prevent falls is by improving your posture. A study showed that incorrect weight shifting, a result of bad posture, was the cause of about 41% of falls–so obviously, having good posture is significant. Improving your loved one’s posture is a good idea, and we go into detail as to why, and into how to go about doing so. Continue Reading

End-of-Life Care: An Introduction 

 
CareDiscussing end-of-life care for a loved one is a difficult topic of conversation for most families. But understanding what to expect–and what you can do to help ensure your loved one’s comfort in the final stages of their life–may help to ease the journey both for you and your loved one. Here’s our Encompass introduction to the basics of end-of-life care.  Continue Reading
 
CaregiverWhen a loved one passes, it’s not uncommon for a caregiver to feel a range of emotions. No matter what you’re feeling, it’s important to remember that you’re not alone. Although everyone’s caregiving experience is unique, others have gone through what you’re going through–and here, we give some advice as to what life beyond caregiving might look like. Continue Reading…

Interesting Links


Conclusion


Thanks for reading. 

If you like what you’ve read here, visit us at encompassomaha.com for further reading. We write several times a week about the problems and questions facing children with aging parents.

Physicians Choice Private Duty–provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of geriatric care options, and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the “system.” Get your free Cost Comparison Guide by clicking here. Or, contact us just to say hello!

 

“Physicians Choice Private Duty solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit us today..”

 

 

Fall Prevention in the Winter

Fear of falling is one of the biggest concerns for the elderly and their loved ones all-year-round. And, unfortunately, during the winter months that fear can be heightened.

So today, we’re going to give you a few tips on preventing falls to help you prep for the winter months ahead.

Preventing falls outside of the house

In our previous post, we mentioned a few ways to keep outside activities to a minimum, such as asking neighbors or family members help with retrieving mail, throwing away trash, and shoveling walkways.

With that in mind, here are a few more things to mention:

Keeping ice-melt handy: Along with shoveling the walkways, it’s always a good idea to have plenty of ice-melt on hand. If possible, try to make sure someone is putting enough ice-melt on the walkway in order to prevent any build-up.

Winter boots/shoes: Having a special pair of boots or shoes with non-slip tracking can help decrease the likelihood of falls while out on snow and ice.

Other considerations: Less sunlight and other winter weather conditions often decreases visibility, which can make it much hard to walk around outside. Try to stay inside during heavy snowfall, very windy days, or as the sun sets.

Preventing falls inside of the house

As you know, falls can occur inside of the home as well, but there are a few extra things to consider when it comes to fall prevention in the winter:

Non-slip socks or slippers: Walking on cold floors can be uncomfortable. If you wear slippers or socks, make sure they are non-slip.

Cleaning up wet spots: Tracking snow into the house can sometimes be a problem. To prevent this, try to make sure boots and any wet clothing can dry above a winter doormat.

Keeping clutter to a minimum: Unfortunately, clutter can build up in the winter months with all of the extra clothes and blankets. Prevent this by making sure everything has (and goes in) its proper place.

As we’ve mentioned before, getting ready for winter can be a daunting task. But with these tips, we hope that we can make getting through the winter a little easier for your family. And as always, let us know if you have any questions by commenting below or connecting with us on Twitter.

Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of geriatric care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. Get your free Cost Comparison guide by clicking here. Or contact us for a free consultation, or just to say hello!

photo credit: liamunch via photopin cc

“Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.private-duty.pchhc.com.”

 

 

Helping an Elderly Parent Prepare for Winter

Winter is just around the corner, and while families prepare for the festivities of the season, they should also prepare for the many risks that can come with the cold weather.

Throughout this week, we’ll discuss some tips on how to prepare for winter, from keeping warm, to fall prevention, to emergency winter events.

For today, we will start by covering several tips on keeping warm that will help you (and your elderly loved ones) prepare for the coming winter months.

As the temperature drops, it’s important to make sure that you are doing everything possible to keep you or your loved one warm. A cold winter night can be dangerous if you aren’t adequately prepared for it. Along with wearing extra clothing, here’s what we suggest:

Call for a furnace check up. This time of the year is when you’ll be using your furnace the most, so it’s important that you make sure your furnace is working in tip-top shape. Have a professional come out and take a look. Once the tune up is complete, ask for 24-hour emergency number and make sure the number is posted where it can be easily found (we suggest on the refrigerator, or possibly in their cell phone).

Keep blankets handy. Having blankets in easy-to-reach places around the house is another way to help keep you or your loved one warm. Try to make sure extra blankets are kept near their most frequented places (e.g. favorite chair, sofa, or bedroom).

Try to keep outside activities to a minimum. Despite the turn in weather, you or your loved one might need to go outside in order to throw out the trash, get the mail, etc.

However, there are ways to keep these activities to a minimum:

  • Ask your mailman to deliver the mail to your door. If he or she is unable to do so, ask a neighbor or family member to pick up the mail for you.
  • Ask a neighbor, family member, or even a professional service to help shovel the driveway and walkway. Shoveling snow can be difficult as you age–the risk of overworking yourself increases and can lead to a number of health problems.
  • Ask for help with trash removal. Picking up a heavy bag of trash can already be difficult task in old age, and having to carry it in cold and slippery conditions can make it worse. If you already have a neighbor or family member helping your elderly parent get your mail or shovel the drive-way, ask if they can help bring trash to the end of the drive-way for pick up. It may even be possible to have the snow-removal team help.

Getting ready for winter can be a daunting task, but with these tips, we hope to ease the tension in order to make the holiday season a great one for you and your family.

If you have any questions or concerns about any of the information here or want more tips on how to prepare for winter, let us know in the comments below or on Twitter. We’re always happy to help!

Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of geriatric care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. Get your free Cost Comparison guide by clicking here. Or contact us for a free consultation or just to say hello!

photo credit: gigi 62 via photopin cc

“Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.private-duty.pchhc.com.”

 

 

The 5 Best Online Resources for Post-Caregivers

This past week, we’ve given you an overview on life beyond caregiving, and a few considerations on how to begin your life beyond caregiving.

As we’ve mentioned in this series, figuring out how to begin your life after caregiving ends can be difficult.

So below, we’ve compiled a list of the best online resources for post-caregivers.

Caregiver Relief Fund.

The Caregiver Relief Fund is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization that provides financial assistance and planning to caregivers in order to help them ensure a secure future after the caregiving ends.

Caregiver Media Group.

The Caregiver Media Group is a multimedia agency dedicated to providing information, support and guidance for family and professional caregivers. Their resources include the Todays Caregiver magazine, the Caregiver Bookclub, Newsletters, and other various channels and care tip articles.

Family Caregiver Alliance (FCA).

The FCA is another nonprofit organization that works to provide information to caregivers from around the country. Our favorite resources are their fact & tip sheets (in multiple languages), support groups, and Connections Newsletters, which focus specifically on the issues and needs of caregivers.

Caregiver Action Network (CAN).

CAN is a great online resource for networking, providing education, peer support, and advice from experts working in caregiving or caregiving-related agencies and businesses. The membership is free, making it a low-level commitment for those who feel unsure about joining. If you are interested, we also suggest that you take a peek at their Family Caregiver Forum, which covers a number of topics, including Life After Caregiving.

National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC).

The NAC is made up of various organizations focusing on issues of family caregiving and works to help improve policies that affect family caregivers as well as work to strengthen and maintain caregiving coalitions at the state and local level.

Whether you are currently a caregiver or you’re a post-caregiver, these online resources are great a way to know that there is a community of like-minded individuals willing to share their similar experiences with you. At Encompass, we understand how difficult of a process end-of-life care can be. If you have any questions or would just like to talk, give us call. We’d love to hear from you.

Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of geriatric care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. Get your free Cost Comparison guide by clicking here. Or contact us for a free consultation or just to say hello!

photo credit: tedeytan via photopin cc

“Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.private-duty.pchhc.com.”

 

 

How to Begin Your Life Beyond Caregiving

On Monday, we gave you a general overview of life beyond caregiving.

As a caregiver who has devoted their time and strength into ensuring the best quality of life for a loved one, it may be difficult to see what your life will be like after the caregiving ends. It’s not uncommon for a former caregiver to have their sense of purpose or self-worth affected.

However, it’s important to remember that your caregiving experience has given you a set of skills, and new perspective on life that can help you move forward and live a rewarding life.

With that in mind, we’re going to discuss a few ways you can begin your post-care life.

Connect with others

As we’ve mentioned, you’re not alone in your post-caregiving experience. Although your experience is unique, there are many post-caregivers out there who have had similar experiences. Connecting with other caregivers may help combat your loneliness by building and fostering friendships based on a mutual understanding of a difficult point in each other’s lives.

Share your story

Though not for everyone, some people may find it comforting to share their caregiving experience. This can be done in a number of ways, from setting up your own blog or guest-blogging for a caregiving organization, to simply writing down your experience in a journal.

Regardless of the format, sharing your experience gives you an outlet to properly express the many emotions you may now be feeling as a former caregiver. In addition to helping yourself, you might also even help other post caregivers put their frustrations at ease, and give current caregivers and researchers a better understanding of the post-caregiving transition.

Put your skills to use

Throughout your caregiving experience, you’ve gained a number of invaluable skills that can still be put to good use. If you miss helping others, consider volunteering at a local respite program for seniors, or finding a part time job to fill your time and help you gain back your sense of purpose.

In the end, you may find caregiving to be a passion of yours–as was the case with Ms. Van Der Waal, a former caregiver to her husband. In an interview with The New Old Age blogger, Judith Graham, Ms. Van Der Waal said, In the beginning, it was a connection with my past and with Wayne… but it’s become a joy and I’ve come to realize that, for me at least, once a caregiver always a caregiver.

Figuring out your life beyond caregiving can be difficult. But keeping these considerations in mind can help ease this difficult period, in turn helping you realize the new perspective you gained, and the significant impact you’ve made on your loved ones life.

Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of geriatric care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. Get your free Cost Comparison guide by clicking here. Or contact us for a free consultation or just to say hello!

photo credit: tedeytan via photopin cc

“Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.private-duty.pchhc.com.”

 

 

Helping Grandmother Walk

Last week, we discussed end-of-life care–giving you the appropriate steps and decisions that go into late stage care–in order to help make the journey as comfortable as possible for you and your loved ones.

End-of-life care can be difficult. Not only can end-of-life care be stressful for those going through the process–it can also be stressful for the caregiver and families who endure it with them.

Throughout this week, we’ll discuss the various stages of post-caregiving, how to transition from caregiver to post-caregiver, and the network of post-caregivers out in the community.

For today, we’ll start by outlining some basic, though very important things to keep in mind as you move beyond caregiving:

Feeling is part of the transition 

When a loved one passes, it is not uncommon for a caregiver to feel a range of emotions; these may come in small steady waves, or come on suddenly after keeping them at bay.

As a post-caregiver you may feel an utter sense of loss–not only from mourning the loss of a loved one, but also because you are unsure what to do with your time after committing to a daily routine of caring for a loved one for so long.

It’s important to remember that you are not alone. Feeling such emotions is a part of the transitioning process. Now, you have time to reflect on your own thoughts and take care of yourself, whereas before, your primary concern was caring for another.

Everyones caregiving experience is unique, but keeping in mind that there are others who may have gone through somewhat similar experiences and are now feeling what you are feeling can be comforting and may help you move forward.

Caregivers gain a new perspective on life

You might think that the skills you acquired while caring for your loved one are useless now that they have passed. However, that may not necessarily be the case.

According to a study taken from the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias, researchers found the following:

  • After they have overcome the immediate sense of loss, former-caregivers possess a higher level of well-being than those have not provided care.
  • Researchers also found that post-caregivers find themselves to be more organized, financially savvy and highly efficient at completing tasks due to assuming the responsibilities of their daily routines and their loved ones.

Overcoming end-of-life care can be difficult. But as you transition beyond the life of caregiving, it’s important to remember that you have made a significant difference in your loved ones life. And through the caregiving process, you’ve also acquired a brand new set of skills and perspective, enriching your own life as well.

Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of geriatric care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. Get your free Cost Comparison guide by clicking here. Or contact us for a free consultation or just to say hello!

photo credit: Rosie O’Beirne via photopin cc

“Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.private-duty.pchhc.com.”

 

 

Final Decisions and Preparation for End-of-Life Care

This past week, we’ve given an introduction to end-of-life care and said what can (and needs to) be done in order to plan for appropriate end-of-life care.

While end-of-life care is certainly a difficult subject to discuss, careful planning for the final stages of life can help put you and your loved ones at ease.

For our last segment on end-of-life care, we’ve outlined several decisions that need to be considered during end-of-life care. Taking the time to make these decisions help to ease an already difficult process, allowing you and your family to devote more time and energy to providing comfort to a loved one in their final stages of life.

Once you and your loved one have made the decision to begin end-of-life care, it is important to make the necessary arrangements as early as possible. These may include:

Assessing end-of-life wishes

It is always important to consider the spiritual practices and memorial traditions of your loved one. Be sure to ask what they are most comfortable with–having their input will put you and your family at ease, knowing that you are fulfilling your loved ones wishes.

Choosing a primary decision maker

Once your loved ones end-of-life wishes have been assessed, it may be necessary to designate one family member as the primary decision maker who will manage information and coordinate family involvement and support. Proper communication and coordination make it easier to make final decisions.

If your loved one has expressed a preference as to who should take lead, please take that into consideration.

Making financial and legal arrangements

One way to ensure that your loved ones wishes are properly understood is by seeking financial and legal advice. Legal documents such as a living will, power of attorney, or advance directive can set forth a patients wishes for future health care so that family members are all clear about their loved ones preferences. This in turn can prevent unnecessary family conflicts that prevent you from devoting your time to providing comfortable living for your loved one.

Other considerations:

Sudden end-of-life decisions 

Unfortunately, some loved ones are unable to express their final wishes due to a number of reasons. Should this occur, you may consider the following:

  • Consider conversations in the past that may have indicated their final wishes
  • Consider treatment, placement, and decisions about dying from the patients vantage point
  • Seek medical and legal advice for the best possible outcome

Involving children

Although involving children may be a very difficult choice to make, some families feel that it is necessary. Should you choose to do so, Helpguide.org suggests explaining the events in terms they can grasp. These may include: storytelling, drawing pictures, or using puppets to simulate feelings.

We know end-of-life care can be difficult, but it is important to keep in mind that these decisions are meant to help provide care and comfort for your loved one.

If you are unsure about where to start, we are here to help. At Encompass, our comprehensive assessments and living strategies for seniors allow families to make informed decisions about the appropriate next steps–making a significant impact in their lives as well and in the lives of their loved ones.

Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of geriatric care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. Get your free Cost Comparison guide by clicking here. Or contact us for a free consultation or just to say hello!

photo credit: Oceans of Lilim via photopin cc

“Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.private-duty.pchhc.com.”

 

How to Plan Appropriately for End-of-Life Care

On Monday, we gave you a general overview of what end-of-life care entails, as well as a guideline for helping you decide when end-of-life care may be necessary.

As we mentioned, talking about end-of-life care can be a rather difficult conversation for anyone to have, but it’s important to remember that end-of-life care is meant to provide physical, mental, and emotional comfort, as well as social support, to a loved-one living with and dying of advanced illness.

So today, we are going to discuss what can (and needs to) be done in order to plan for appropriate end-of-life care.

Patient and Caregiver Needs

According to Helpguide.org, there are at least four areas that should be considered when planning for appropriate end-of-life care.

Those include the following:

  • Practical care and assistance. As you transition towards end-of-life care, it may be necessary to provide your loved one with assistance for everyday activities, such as bathing, feeding, going to the bathroom, and getting dressed. Along with your own efforts, extra support can be provided by personal care assistants, a hospice team, or physician-ordered nursing services.
  • Comfort and dignity. Aside from ensuring your loved one is cared for physically, end-of-life care patients should feel at ease mentally, in order to prevent feelings of loneliness and fear of dying. Ensuring your loved one that they have the support of their family and those around them is vital to maintaining a comfortable journey.
  • Respite Care. Although you may not want to leave the side of your loved one, having a moment to recollect your thoughts can ease the intensity of end-of-life care. Respite care can help provide you comfort through a brief inpatient stay in a hospice facility or having a hospice volunteer care for your loved one for a few hours.
  • Grief support. Another important aspect of end-of-life care is preparing you and your family for the coming loss of a loved one. Consider consulting bereavement specialists or spiritual advisors before your loved one’s death in order to help ease the transition.

Home Care or Inpatient Care?

When assessing end-of-life care, a patient and their family can have the option of home care or inpatient care.

Home care. Your loved one may prefer to be as close as possible to their family as they go through end-of-life care. Should they choose to have end-of-life care administered in their home or a family members home, you or a loved one can assume the role of caregiver or enlist the help of hospice care professionals.

Inpatient care. Another option is inpatient care. Inpatient facilities can provide round-the-clock medical support as well as palliative and hospice care.

Regardless of your choice, the main goal of end-of-life care should be provide your loved one with the most comfortable environment possible. If you have any questions, feel free to contact us at anytime. And don’t forget to check back on Friday to see the our post on making final decisions for end-of-life care.

Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of geriatric care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. Get your free Cost Comparison guide by clicking here. Or contact us for a free consultation or just to say hello!

photo credit: Abdulsalam Haykal via photopin cc

“Physicians’ Choice Private Duty Assisted Living solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.private-duty.pchhc.com.”