A recent study by the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that upwards of 40 percent of colonoscopies performhome care omahaed on seniors between 76 and 85 years of age may be inappropriate under current guidelines. Even though a colonoscopy is a routine procedure every five to 10 years for many adults over 50, another study by the Annals of Internal Medicine found that those over 80 were at 50 percent greater risk for developing colon-related complications than those aged 60 to 69, as reported by the AARP.

But the question on the minds of many here is whether the uncomfortable procedure is worth it for those over 75. One example would be if colon cancer is detected, the surgery to treat it is painful and could lead to other complications, especially if an elderly person already suffers from other terminal conditions. When someone is nearing the end of their life, it’s important to remember it’s OK to say no to certain treatments. Of course, have thorough conversations about the subject with physicians and family before making any rash decisions.

Colorectal cancer stats (via the CDC)

    • Colorectal cancer is the second leading caner-related cause of death among men and women in the United States and the third most common cancer among men and women in the U.S.

 

2009 numbers (most recent that are available):

    • 136,717 people were diagnosed with colorectal cancer in the U.S. (70,223 were men and 66,494 were women).

 

    • 51,848 people died from colorectal cancer in the U.S. (26,806 were men and 25,042 were women).

 

On the encouraging side of things the death rate from colorectal cancer has been dropping for more than 20 years, according to Cancer.org, and there are currently more than 1 million survivors of colorectal cancer living in the U.S. today. This is likely due to factors such as screenings that allow more cancers to be found earlier (when it’s easy to cure) and recent advancements in treatment.

Encompass Senior Solutions currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of the available care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. All Encompass services are directed by registered nurses or licensed clinical social workers with no long-term contracts. Contact us today for help with your senior care needs.

Photo credit: TipsTimes via photopin cc

“Encompass Senior Solutions solves the problems families face in finding home health care providers they can trust. Providers who will focus on strategies that keep parents in their homes. To learn more about our health care services, visit http://www.encompass-home-health-care.com.”

home care omahaWe all know that most visits with the doctor are brief. With this being the case, it’s important to use your time wisely when the doctor is actually in the room. During that 10-15 minute window, both men and women should be prepared to ask pressing questions, the AARP’s Dorothy Foltz-Gray told the Huffington Post.

“In general, the most important advice from the doctors is to advocate for yourself — and to prepare for doctor appointments as you would for any important meeting,” she told the website.

Foltz-Gray goes on to focus on important questions that men over 50 should ask their doctors. Remember, advocating for oneself can be even more difficult for an elderly person already slowed down an array of ailments. So the same questions apply a senior man’s caregiver as well.

1. How often should I be screened for prostate cancer?

Recent studies suggest many men are being over-treated for prostrate cancer. Even so, doctors are looking for an elevated prostrate specific antigen (PSA). Foltz-Gray suggests talking with a doctor about how to best proceed if an elevated PSA is detected. This may mean repeated PSA tests every six months to keep a close eye on PSA levels.

2. How often should I have my blood pressure checked?

This should be part of a man’s yearly physical and include both blood pressure and cholesterol readings.

3. I think there’s something wrong with my sexual health. Any suggestions?

As uncomfortable as it may be, a patient should speak up about matters such as sexual health, as the more the doctor knows the better he or she can help.

4. I’m having trouble sleeping. What should I do?

Sleep apnea affects 18 million Americans, and more so men than women, according to the Center for Disease Control. Your doctor can offer suggestions to help, such as limiting caffeine, alcohol, nicotine and/or losing weight, etc.

5. Now that we’ve discussed my problems, what’s my diagnosis?

Don’t leave the doctor’s office feeling confused or scared about what could be wrong with you. Rather, press your doctor for the answers you desire. If the he or she doesn’t have a definitive answer, ask how you can get more information. Remember, the doctor is there to help.

Encompass Senior Solutions currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of the available care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. All Encompass services are directed by registered nurses or licensed clinical social workers with no long-term contracts. Contact us today for help with your senior care needs.

Photo credit: Ham Sughes via photopin cc

“Encompass Senior Solutions solves the problems families face in finding home health care providers they can trust. Providers who will focus on strategies that keep parents in their homes. To learn more about our health care services, visit http://www.encompass-home-health-care.com.”

home care omahaCaregiving responsibilities are often blurred in blended families. For example, the husband of an aging couple is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. The wife needs help with her husband’s care but when she reaches out to her now grown children from a previous marriage, they are reluctant in offering much help in overseeing the care of their stepfather. Likewise, the husband’s children are hesitant to offer help as well, as they assume their father’s new wife will take on most if not all caregiving responsibilities.

This topic was the focus of a recent article on The New York Time’s New Old Age blog, which revealed that the boomer generation — the generation most likely to have step children — will likely find themselves in scenarios very similar to the example above. Pew research backs this up. A study found that 42 percent of the 2,700 people surveyed had at least one step-relative.

Atlanta-based clinical social worker Moira Keller told the Times that the lines are blurry who’s going to do what. For one, most grown children don’t have much history with their parent’s new spouse and thus don’t feel obligated to intervene or help out when a step parent becomes ill. Another possibility is that it’s often unclear who even has decision making authority — children or the new spouse.

The article noted that there are other situations that can lead to a stepchild’s lack of participation in caregiving. Research has shown that the obligation to become a caregiver is weaker in stepchildren than in biological children, who naturally feel the need to reciprocate the care they received from their parents who raised them. More dubious factors such as money can enter into the equation as well.

So what should older couples who remarry do? Discuss what will happen when illness or dependence strike, however difficult a subject it might be to talk about.

“Who’s going to take care of you if you become sick? Talk about that while you’re still healthy, Keller told the Times.If I could yell one thing from a mountaintop it’s to talk about this stuff.”

What roles should stepchildren play in caregiving? Let us know in the comments or on Twitter.

Encompass Senior Solutions currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of the available care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. All Encompass services are directed by registered nurses or licensed clinical social workers with no long-term contracts. Contact us today for help with your senior care needs.

Photo credit: iMorpheus via photopin cc

“Encompass Senior Solutions solves the problems families face in finding home health care providers they can trust. Providers who will focus on strategies that keep parents in their homes. To learn more about our health care services, visit http://www.encompass-home-health-care.com.”

 

Today’s post is part of our ongoing series, The Encompass Way. Here, we’ll go over many of the steps involved in setting up a comprehensive care plan, which helps us to provide seniors and their families a complete understanding of the available care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system.

mmse omaha

The Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE) is a quick and easy way for professional caregivers to determine the status of a patient’s cognitive abilities. It’s especially useful way to measure whether or not a person is suffering from cognitive decline brought on by an illness, as such a matter requires prompt and aggressive action. WithMMSE, a patient’s mental state is tested in the following areas: orientation, registration, recall, language and attention and calculation.

Below is the version of the MMSE that Encompass Senior Solutions uses.

Mini Mental Status Exam

Name: ______________________  DOB: ______________________

Years of School: _______________ Date of Exam: ______________________

SCORING

Maximum score 30 — below 20 usually indicates cognitive impairment. Each correct answer is worth one point or as noted otherwise.

Orientation to time

Today’s date

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Month

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Year

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Day of the week

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Season

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Orientation to Place

Where are we?

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

What room is this?

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

What city?

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Country?

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

State?

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

TOTAL: _____________

Immediate Recall

Ask if you may test his/her memory. Then say “ball,” “flag,” “tree” clearly and slowly. After you said all three words, ask him/her to repeat them. The first repetition determines the score (0-3).

Ball

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Flag

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Tree

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

TOTAL: _____________

 Attention

Ask the individual to begin with 100 and count backwards by sevens. Stop after five subtractions. Score the subtractions.

93

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

86

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

79

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

72

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

65

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

TOTAL: _____________

Ask the individual to spell the word “WORLD” backwards. The score is the number of letters in correct order.

D

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

L

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

R

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

O

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

W

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Delayed Verball Recall

Ask the individual to recall the three words you previously asked him/her to remember.

Ball

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Flag

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Tree

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

TOTAL: _____________

Naming

Show the individual a wristwatch and ask him/her what it is. Repeat the process, substituting a pencil.

Watch

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Pencil

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

TOTAL: _____________

Repetition

Ask the individual to repeat the following:

“No if, ands or buts”

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

TOTAL: _____________

Three-Stage Command

Give the individual a plain piece of paper and say, “Take the paper in your hand, fold it in half and put it on the floor.”

Takes

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Folds

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

Puts

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

TOTAL: _____________

Reading

Hold up the card that reads “Close your eyes” so the individual can see it clearly. Ask him/her to read it and do what it says. Score correctly only if the individual closes his/her eyes.

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

TOTAL: _____________

Writing

Give the individual a piece of paper and ask him/her to write a sentence. It is to be written spontaneously. It must contain a subject and a verb and be sensible.

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

TOTAL: _____________

Copying

Give the individual a piece of paper and ask him/her to copy a design of the two intersecting shapes. One point is awarded for correctly copying the shapes. All angles on both figures must be present and the figures must have one overlapping angle.

    • Correct

 

    • Incorrect

 

TOTAL: _____________

Image via Wikipedia commons

TOTAL SCORE: _____________

You can download/print a copy of the MMSE here.

Currently serving Omaha and surrounding areas, all Encompass services are directed by registered nurses or licensed clinical social workers with no long-term contracts. Contact us today for help with your senior care needs.

Photo credit: istargazer via photopin cc

“Encompass Senior Solutions solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.encompass-assessments.com.”

Today’s post is part of our series, The Encompass Way. Here, we’ll go over many of the steps involved in setting up a comprehensive care plan, which helps us t provide seniors and their families a complete understanding of the available care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system.

home care omahaEncompass Senior Solutions professionals conduct a comprehensive in-home assessment for each of our clients. Each assessment looks at a client’s current psychological, environmental, functionality and medical status, helping us develop a written plan of care and coordinate the health care providers and family members who are responsible for the execution of the plan of care.

Part of determining a client’s functionality status is to use the Instrumental of Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale. Although IADLs are not essential for fundamental functioning, they do allow a person live a more independent and fulfilling life.

Below is an adaption of of M.P. Lawton and E.M. Brody’s IADL scale via the Abrams Center.

Index of Activities of Daily Living

INSTRUCTIONS

Circle the scoring point for the statement that most closely corresponds to the patient’s current functional ability for each task. The examiner should complete the scale based on information directly from the patient, the patient’s family and any other caregivers and recent records.

ACTIVITY

Ability to use telephone

    • 0 = Does not use telephone at all

 

    • 1 = Dials a few well-known numbers

 

    • 1 = Answers the phone, but does not dial

 

    • 1 = Operates telephone on own initiative

 

Shopping

    • 0 = Completely unable to shop

 

    • 0 = Needs to be accompanied on any shopping trip

 

    • 0 = Shops independently for small purchases

 

    • 1 = Takes care of all shopping needs independently

 

Food preparation

    • 0 = Needs to have meals prepared and served

 

    • 0 = Heats and serves prepared meals, or prepares meals but does not maintain adequate diet

 

    • 0 = Prepares adequate meals if supplied with ingredients

 

    • 1 = Plans, prepares and serves adequate meals independently

 

Housekeeping

    • 0 = Does not participate in any housekeeping

 

    • 1 = Needs help with all home maintenance tasks

 

    • 1 = Performs light daily tasks but cannot maintain acceptable level of cleanliness

 

    • 1 = Performs light daily tasks such as dishwashing and bed making

 

    • 1 = Maintains house alone or with occasional assistance

 

Laundry

    • 0 = All laundry must be done by others

 

    • 1 = Launders small items

 

    • 1 = Does personal laundry completely

 

Mode of transportation

    • 0 = Does not travel at all

 

    • 0 = Travel limited to taxi or automobile when assisted/accompanied by another

 

    • 1 = Arranges own travel, but does not otherwise use public transportation

 

    • 1 = Travel independently on public transportation or drives own car

 

Responsibility for own medications

    • 0 = Is not capable of dispensing own medication

 

    • 0 = Takes responsibility if medication is prescribed in advance in separate dosages

 

    • 1 = Is responsible for taking medication in correct dosages at correct time

 

Ability to handle finances

    • 0 = Incapable of handling money

 

    • 1 = Manages day-to-day purchases, but needs help with banking, major purchases, etc.

 

    • 1 = Manages financial matters independently (budgets, writes checks, pays rent, pays bills, goes to the bank, collects, keeps track of income, etc.)

 

SCORING

Add the total of the points circled. The total score may range from 0-8. A lower score indicates a higher level of dependence.

Related

Index of Activities of Daily Living

Currently serving Omaha and surrounding areas, all Encompass services are directed by registered nurses or licensed clinical social workers with no long-term contracts. Contact us today for help with your senior care needs.

Photo credit: marchasselbalch via photopin cc

“Encompass Senior Solutions solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.encompass-assessments.com.”

Today’s post is part of our ongoing series, The Encompass Way. Here, we’ll go over many of the steps involved in setting up a comprehensive care plan, which helps us to provide seniors and their families a complete understanding of the available care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system.

elderly home care omahaProfessionals from Encompass Senior Solutions conduct a comprehensive in-home assessment for each new client, complete with a psychological, environmental, functional and medical assessment. From the information we gather, a written plan of care is created to help determine the roles of both health care providers and family members who are responsible for implementing and/or overseeing the client’s care.

Below is a sample of one of the forms we ask our clients to complete as part of our medical assessment, helping to bring to light any physical health concerns the client may have. The results from this simple “yes” or “no” assessment eventually go into the final written plan of care.

Easy Exercise and Screening Assessment

1. Do you have pains, tightness or pressure in your chest during physical activities (like walking, climbing, stairs and/or household chores)?

2. Do you currently experience dizziness or lightheadedness?

    • Yes

 

    • No

 

    • N/A

 

3. Have you been told that you have high blood pressure?

    • Yes

 

    • No

 

    • N/A

 

4. Do you have pain, stiffness or swelling that limits or prevents your from doing what you want or need to do?

    • Yes

 

    • No

 

    • N/A

 

5. Do you fall, feel unsteady or use an assistive device while standing and/or walking?

    • Yes

 

    • No

 

    • N/A

 

6. Is there a health reason not mentioned why you would be concerned about starting an exercise program?

    • Yes

 

    • No

 

    • N/A

 

Currently serving Omaha and surrounding areas, all Encompass services are directed by registered nurses or licensed clinical social workers with no long-term contracts. Contact us today for help with your senior care needs.

 

Photo credit: Ruben Garcia Mohedano via photopin cc

“Encompass Senior Solutions solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.encompass-assessments.com.”

dementia omahaA recent study suggests that family caregivers who use positive coping strategies could be slowing the progression of dementia in the loved ones they’re caring for. This research comes from Utah State and Johns Hopkins University, which assessed more than 200 demintia patients and their caregivers twice a year over a six year span, reported the AARP.

With an aim to measure genetic and environmental factors that might affect the rate of the progression of dementia, patients were given brief exams which measured cognitive abilities such as attention, memory, language and orientation. The research found that caregivers who took a problem-solving approach to coping saw slower rates of decline in care recipients with dementia than caregivers who did not take a problem solving approach as often.

So what exactly is this problem-solving approach to coping? The article describes it as those with good social support who count their blessings, i.e., those apt at “changing how [they] look at a situation and focusing on the positive rather than trying to tackle the problem itself.” Another bonus of these positive coping strategies is that they lead to less caregiver stress, according to the study.

Utah State professor JoAnn Tschanz, the study’s lead author, offered the following strategies for caregivers, adapted below.

    • Avoid arguing or correcting your loved one with dementia as the disease may limit his or her ability to see things from separate points of view.

 

    • Your loved one’s abilities may vary depending on whether he or she is having a good or bad day. Try to figure out patterns to the bad days as to identify trigger behaviors.

 

    • Don’t forget to take time for yourself. You need it and deserve it.

 

    • Do your homework so you know how dementia progresses. This helps you be prepared to seek professional help when the time comes.

 

Do you think the results of the study are credible? Let us know in the comments or on Twitter.

Encompass Senior Solutions currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of the available care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. All Encompass services are directed by registered nurses or licensed clinical social workers with no long-term contracts. Contact us today for help with your senior care needs.

Photo credit: Brian Auer via photopin cc

“Encompass Senior Solutions solves the problems families face in finding home health care providers they can trust. Providers who will focus on strategies that keep parents in their homes. To learn more about our health care services, visit http://www.encompass-home-health-care.com.”

Even sports and caregiving worlds sometimes merge together. One such time is now, as March Madness is upon us, making it the perfect time to take a look at the inspiring journey of Pat Summitt, the legendary basketball coach of the University of Tennessee Lady Vols who was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease in 2011.

During her 38 years at the helm of Lady Vols basketball team, Summitt’s accomplishments are second to none. For one, she became the winningest coach in the history of college basketball, men’s or women’s. Two, her squads won eight national titles, unmatched in women’s college basketball (and second only to John Wooden, who won 10 for the UCLA men’s team).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aw63zL3Ji8E

Only 60 years old, one could imagine Summitt would’ve only added to her 1,098 wins and likely earned a few more championships to surpass Wooden, but Alzheimer’s had a different plan for her.

“When I first was diagnosed, I was in disbelief,” Summitt told NPR. “But after that, I knew what I was facing, and I wanted to get it out there. And that’s exactly what I did.”

A disease that progresses over time — affecting memory, thinking and behavior — Alzheimer’s is incurable and results in eventual death. Still, as someone with a competitive spirit that could rival anyone’s in, well, history, Summitt is battling Alzheimer’s as only she knows how, by believing she can overcome. This makes it easy to be inspired by Summitt’s willingness to openly discuss her struggles. As such, below are motivational quotes from Summitt.

You can’t always be the strongest or most talented or most gifted person in the room, but you can be the most competitive. Competition allows you to influence your opponent.

Teamwork is what makes common people capable of uncommon results.

The willingness to experiment with change may be the most essential ingredient to success at anything.

If you’re ever in trouble think “left foot, right foot, breathe” and go forward.

For an in-depth look at Summitt’s life and her battles with Alzheimer’s, pick up a copy of her knew memoir, Sum It Up.

Encompass Senior Solutions  currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa ” provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of the available care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. All Encompass services are directed by registered nurses or licensed clinical social workers with no long-term contracts. Contact us today for help with your senior care needs.

“Encompass Senior Solutions solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.encompass-assessments.com.”

music therapy eldersMusic has the power to act as therapy for people with special needs of all ages and abilities. With more than 6,000 music therapists currently operating in the United States (certified through the American Music Therapy Association), you should be able to find someone in your area if you believe music may help your aging loved one’s condition.

So what’s music therapy used for? Well, just about everything. Health workers currently use music to treat a wide range of conditions — from depression, brain injury and Huntington’s disease to Parkinson’s disease, stroke and cardiac disease, according to the AARP. It’s even being used for pain management during cancer treatments.

Even so, you don’t have to be a health care professional to reap the benefits of music. Below are a few tips on incorporating music into your everyday life from veteran music therapist Amy Goyer via the AARP caregiving blog.

    • Keep a CD or mp3 player nearby your loved one’s favorite spot to sit outside. This can turn solitary time into a relaxing and stimulating experience as your mother enjoys her favorite tunes — from big band swing to classical to contemporary favorites.

 

    • Watch a lot of musicals. Not only are the plots easier to follow, as Goyer notes, you can even get up and dance and sing along with your loved one.

 

    • Try mixing music and physical activity. Take a walk with your elderly father and sing songs he remembers (you might be amazed at what he does). Goyer calls this “a golden combination for brain stimulation.”

 

Of course, caregivers can benefit from a little music therapy as well. When you need to unwind, listen to music to help you calm down and relax.

If you’d like to learn more, you can join Goyer for an online webchat on Tuesday, March 19 from 3 to 4 p.m. ET.

Encompass Senior Solutions currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of the available care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. All Encompass services are directed by registered nurses or licensed clinical social workers with no long-term contracts. Contact us today for help with your senior care needs.

Photo credit: hunter.gatherer via photopin cc

“Encompass Senior Solutions solves the problems families face in finding home health care providers they can trust. Providers who will focus on strategies that keep parents in their homes. To learn more about our health care services, visit http://www.encompass-home-health-care.com.”

 

30th_anniv_logo_c

The Alzheimer’s Association Midlands Chapter is offering ongoing caregiver education series for those caring for someone suffering from Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia. Held at a senior center in Missouri Valley, Iowa, the series features experts presenting topics of interest to caregivers, according to Alz.org.

For the series in Missouri Valley — which began February 26th and runs through June 25th, 2013 — the Alzheimer’s Association Midlands Chapter and Alegent Creighton Health Community Memorial Hospital are teaming up to present a six week caregiver education series held the fourth Tuesday of every month from 4:30-6:00 p.m. at the Rand Community Senior Center in Missouri Valley. The series is in conjunction with the local Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group. There is no charge to attend any of the events but registration is requested. You can register for one or all of the remaining sessions by calling Alegent Creighton Health Community Memorial Hospital at 712-642-2045.

Below is the schedule (via Alz.org)

    • March 26th — Home Services and Assistance Available: Kathy Baer, Homemakers

 

    • April 23rd — Understanding financial issues when caring for someone with Alzheimers and other dementias: Clayton Freeman, Program Director, Alzheimers Association Midlands Chapter

 

    • May 28th — Taking Care of the Care Giver: Nancy Cyr, LISW

 

    • June 25th — Reducing Anxiety: Rod Black, LISW

 

The Rand Community Senior Center is located at 110 S. 4th Street, Missouri Valley, Iowa.

Beginning in April, there’s another caregiver education series hosted by the Alzheimer’s Association in Elkhorn, Nebraska. Click here for details.

About the Alzheimer’s Association Midlands Chapter (via Alz.org)

Since 1982, the Midlands Chapter has provided education, information and support to individuals afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the related disorders and supports the National Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association in its research for the prevention, cure, and treatment of AD and related disorders. This mission is carried out through Advancing Research, Education & Information, Family Support Services, and Advocacy.

Encompass Senior Solutions  currently serving Omaha, Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa ” provides seniors and their families a complete understanding of the available care options and helps families maneuver through the challenges of the system. All Encompass services are directed by registered nurses or licensed clinical social workers with no long-term contracts. Contact us today for help with your senior care needs.

Image via Alz.org.

“Encompass Senior Solutions solves the challenges families face in caring for aging parents, with a focus on strategies that keep them in their homes. To learn more about our solutions, visit http://www.encompass-assessments.com.”